Evaluation of Left Ventricular Functions after Aortic Valve Replacement in a Specific Young Male Patient Population with Pure Aortic Insufficiency or Aortic Stenosis: 5-Years Follow-up

Authors

  • Cengiz Bolcal
  • Suat Doganci
  • Oben Baysan
  • Vedat Yildirim
  • Murat Sargin
  • Ufuk Demirkilic
  • Harun Tatar

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/HSF98.20061142

Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the left ventricular functions and the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young male patients with pure aortic stenosis or aortic insufficiency with no additional disease.

Methods. Young male patients who underwent AVR because of pure aortic stenosis (AS = 68) and insufficiency (AI = 70) were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 23.2 ± 1.3 and 22.6 ± 1.6 years, respectively. The follow-up time was 5 years. The parameters checked by transthoracic echocardiography were interventricular septum diastolic thickness, left ventricular posterior wall diastolic thickness, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, left ventricle mass, left ventricle mass index, ejection fraction, and peak aortic gradient. Relative ventricle wall thickness was also calculated. Both groups values from the preoperative, postoperative sixth month, second year, and fifth year time intervals were compared.

Results. In the AS group, the preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction (%) value of 53.68 ± 5.04 increased to 63.24 ± 4.11 at the end of the fifth year. In the AI group, the preoperative left ventricular ejection fraction (%) value of 48.40 ± 3.56 increased to 59.77 ± 2.75 at the end of the fifth year. The other left ventricular geometric parameters were also compared within each group. At the end of the fifth year, there were significant and positive changes in each group.

Conclusion. The regression of the left ventricular parameters is a process that occurs over many years following the correction of the primary hemodynamic abnormality. Although the results were similar in the AI and AS group, in the AS group the remodeling process had earlier results than in the AI group.

References

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Published

2006-12-05

How to Cite

Bolcal, C., Doganci, S., Baysan, O., Yildirim, V., Sargin, M., Demirkilic, U., & Tatar, H. (2006). Evaluation of Left Ventricular Functions after Aortic Valve Replacement in a Specific Young Male Patient Population with Pure Aortic Insufficiency or Aortic Stenosis: 5-Years Follow-up. The Heart Surgery Forum, 10(1), E57-E63. https://doi.org/10.1532/HSF98.20061142

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