Intraoperative and Postoperative Variables Associated with Strokes following Cardiac Surgery

Authors

  • Donald S. Likosky
  • Louis R. Caplan
  • Ronald M. Weintraub
  • Gregg S. Hartman
  • David J. Malenka
  • Cathy S. Ross
  • Eric S. Landis
  • Brett Applebaum
  • Steven P. Braff
  • Gerald T. O'Connor

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/HSF98.20041035

Abstract

Background: Strokes are a devastating complication of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Previous work from 1992 to 2000 determined the principal mechanism of strokes occurring secondary to CABG. In the present study, we quantified the association between intraoperative and postoperative variables and stroke mechanisms while adjusting for patient and disease characteristics.

Methods: We conducted a prospective study of 13,897 patients who underwent isolated CABG in northern New England from 1992 to 2000. Data were collected on patient and disease characteristics, intraoperative and postoperative care, and outcomes. Strokes were classified as embolic, hypoperfusion, and mixed (hemorrhage, lacunar, thrombotic, other, multiple, and unclassified). We quantified the association between the intraoperative and postoperative treatment and course variables and the stroke mechanism while adjusting for patient and disease characteristics. Patients without strokes served as the reference group for the determination of odds ratios (OR).

Results: Variables associated with embolic strokes included cardiopulmonary bypass time greater than 2 hours versus less than 1 hour (OR, 1.5; ptrend .03) and postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR, 2.4; P < .001). The risk of hypoperfusion strokes was increased with the duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (OR, 6.4; ptrend .01) and postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR, 5.4; P < .001). Postoperative atrial fibrillation was associated with the risk of mixed strokes (OR, 1.7; P = .04).

References

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Published

2005-01-04

How to Cite

Likosky, D. S., Caplan, L. R., Weintraub, R. M., Hartman, G. S., Malenka, D. J., Ross, C. S., Landis, E. S., Applebaum, B., Braff, S. P., & O’Connor, G. T. (2005). Intraoperative and Postoperative Variables Associated with Strokes following Cardiac Surgery. The Heart Surgery Forum, 7(4), E271-E276. https://doi.org/10.1532/HSF98.20041035

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