A Case of Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection With Preoperative Extensive Cerebral Infarction Successfully Treated Surgically

Authors

  • Shun Hiraga, MD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Tomoaki Hirose, PhD 1Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Ryohei Fukuba, MD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Junichi Takemura, MD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Rei Tonomura, MD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Sayaka Tamada, MD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Kazuhiro MitanI, MD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan
  • Shinya Yokoyama, PhD Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Japan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.4855

Keywords:

Acute aortic dissection, Malperfusion, cerebral infarction

Abstract

Patients with organ malperfusion from acute aortic dissection (AAD) have poor outcomes, and the surgical indications for patients with AAD complicated by extensive cerebral infarction have not been established. Here, we report a successfully treated surgical case of a patient with cerebral infarction and Stanford type A, AAD. A 77-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with a chief complaint of left paresis. After confirming that there was no cerebral hemorrhage with a head computed tomography and an incision in the right neck, and the right internal carotid artery was ligated and closed, emergency surgery was performed with a 24 mm Triplex® raft. The ascending aorta was replaced, and a bypass was performed with a prosthetic graft from the right axillary artery. No cerebral hemorrhage or neurological issues were observed postoperatively, which indicates the possibility of surgical intervention as a treatment strategy for this disease.

References

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Published

2022-09-12

How to Cite

Hiraga, S., Hirose, T., Fukuba, R., Takemura, J., Tonomura, R., Tamada, S., Mitani, K., & Yokoyama, S. (2022). A Case of Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection With Preoperative Extensive Cerebral Infarction Successfully Treated Surgically. The Heart Surgery Forum, 25(5), E645-E648. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.4855

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Articles