Early Clinical Outcomes of Thoracoscopic Mitral Valvuloplasty: The First 90 Cases

Authors

  • Xin-fan Lin, MM Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China
  • Zheng Xu, MM Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China
  • Zi-he Zheng, MM Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China
  • Tao Wang, MM Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China
  • Xiao-fu Dai, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.4807

Keywords:

Mitral valvuloplasty, Thoracoscopy, Minimally invasive surgical procedure, Early clinical outcome

Abstract

Background: We reported 90 cases of thoracoscopic mitral valvuloplasty in its early stages and sought to analyze early clinical outcomes.

Methods: Ninety consecutive patients, who underwent thoracoscopic mitral valvuloplasty at our institute between April 2020 and December 2021, were assessed for outcomes. Clinical data, including baseline characteristics, operative data, postoperative data, and early follow-up results, were collected. The early clinical outcomes were used to assess the reliability and efficiency of this technique.

Results: No in-hospital death occurred. One patient underwent a median sternotomy for bleeding. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed no mitral regurgitation in 82 patients and mitral regurgitation of 0–2 cm2 in six. The remaining two patients with mitral regurgitation >2 cm2 experienced serious systolic anterior motion but underwent successful re-valvuloplasty during a second pump-up. the mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 177.1±54.8 min and aortic clamping time, 114.0±44.9 min. Each patient received a prosthetic ring (CG Future™), and 64 patients received artificial chordae with an average of 2.7±1.5 (ranging from 1 to 6) pairs. The mean follow up was 8.8±7.0 (range, 1–22 months), while two patients were lost to follow up. Recurrent severe mitral regurgitation was observed in one patient three months after the operation, and mitral valve replacement was performed via median sternotomy. During follow up, one patient died of upper respiratory tract infection, and one suffered from low cardiac output.

Conclusions: Thoracoscopic mitral valvuloplasty is safe and effective and, once surgeons overcome the learning curve, can achieve excellent early clinical outcomes.

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Published

2022-09-28

How to Cite

Lin, X.- fan, Xu, Z., Zheng, Z.- he, Wang, T., & Dai, X.- fu. (2022). Early Clinical Outcomes of Thoracoscopic Mitral Valvuloplasty: The First 90 Cases. The Heart Surgery Forum, 25(5), E692-E697. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.4807

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Articles