A New Understanding for Preoperative Management in a Patient with Blunt Brachiocephalic Trunk Injury

Authors

  • Lei Wang Department of Anesthesiology, Pinghu First People’s Hospital, Zhejiang, China
  • Hong-mei Wang Department of Anesthesiology, Pinghu First People’s Hospital, Zhejiang, China
  • Dai-peng Zhou Department of Anesthesiology, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Yan-fei Xia Department of Anesthesiology, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Kai Kang Department of Anesthesiology, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3691

Keywords:

Dexmedetomidine, Perioperative neurocognitive disorders

Abstract

We report a case of a 24-year-old male patient with blunt brachiocephalic trunk injury, who was given low-dose dexmedetomidine (DEX) for 2 weeks to help smoothly pass the preparation period before the recanalization operation. Because the patient’s vital signs were stable after the injury, the surgeon did not perform emergency surgery. Taking into account the characteristics of blunt brachiocephalic trunk injury, it is necessary to avoid damage to or even rupture of brachiocephalic trunk resulting from irritability and high blood pressure. Patients should be sedated to avoid hemodynamic fluctuations that may be caused by cerebral ischemia and restlessness, and based on the patient’s neurological symptoms, prevention or treatment of perioperative neurocognitive disorders (PNDs) cannot be ignored. Therefore, the choice of drugs for bridging the preoperative preparation stage is crucial. DEX is an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist with antianxiety, analgesic, and sedative effects. It can also stabilize hemodynamics, regulate neuroinflammation, and provide neuroprotection. Instead of using either β-adrenergic receptor antagonists or sedatives, the patient received only low-dose DEX during preoperative preparation. DEX achieved the effects of β-adrenergic receptor blockers, vasodilators, and other sedatives, and it also had certain benefits for the patient’s PND. In short, based on our understanding of the relevant physiological factors, risk factors of brachiocephalic trunk injury, and the effects of DEX, low-dose DEX provides a good option for preoperative management in a patient with blunt brachiocephalic trunk injury.

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Published

2021-04-23

How to Cite

wang, lei, Wang , H.- mei ., Zhou , D.- peng ., Xia , Y.- fei ., & Kang, K. (2021). A New Understanding for Preoperative Management in a Patient with Blunt Brachiocephalic Trunk Injury. The Heart Surgery Forum, 24(2), E376-E378. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3691

Issue

Section

Articles