Synchronized Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Prevention of Extubation Failure in Infants after Congenital Heart Surgery

Prevention of Extubation Failure in Infants After Congenital Heart Surgery

Authors

  • Yi-Rong Zheng, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, and Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Jian-Feng Liu, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, and Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Yu-Qing Lei, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, and Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Hong-Lin Wu, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, and Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Hua Cao, MD Department of Cardiac Surgery, and Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Qiang Chen, MD Department of Cardiac Surgery, and Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children's Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3515

Keywords:

SNIPPV, NCPAP, Congenital heart surgery, Cardiopulmonary bypass, Postoperative care

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the application of synchronized nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (SNIPPV) in the respiratory weaning of infants after congenital heart surgery.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 63 infants who were extubated from mechanical ventilation after congenital heart surgery between January 2020 and September 2020. The data, including demographics, anatomic diagnosis, radiology and laboratory test results, and perioperative variables were recorded. Results: The extubation failure rate within 48 h after extubation was significantly lower in the SNIPPV group than in the nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) group. The PaO2 level and PaO2/FiO2 ratio within 48 h after extubation were higher in the SNIPPV group than in the NCPAP group (P < .05). Meanwhile, the PaCO2 level within 48 h was significantly lower in the SNIPPV group (P < .05). Compared with the NCPAP group, the median duration of postoperative noninvasive support and the duration from extubation to hospital discharge were shorter in the SNIPPV group; the total hospital cost was lower in the SNIPPV group. No significant differences were observed between the two groups concerning VAP, pneumothorax, feeding intolerance, sepsis, mortality, and other complications (P > .05).

Conclusion: SNIPPV was shown to be superior to NCPAP in avoiding reintubation after congenital heart surgery in infants and significantly improved oxygenation and reduced PaCO2 retention after extubation. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy and safety of SNIPPV as a routine weaning strategy.

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Published

2021-03-05

How to Cite

Zheng, Y., Liu, J.-F. ., Lei, Y.-Q. ., Wu, H.-L. ., Cao, H. ., & chen, qiang. (2021). Synchronized Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Prevention of Extubation Failure in Infants after Congenital Heart Surgery: Prevention of Extubation Failure in Infants After Congenital Heart Surgery. The Heart Surgery Forum, 24(2), E249-E255. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3515

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