A Comparative Study on Breast Milk Feeding and Formula Milk Feeding in Infants With Congenital Heart Disease After Surgery: A Retrospective Study

Breast Milk Feeding in Infants after Cardiac Surgery

Authors

  • Xian-Rong Yu, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Ning Xu, MM Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
  • Shu-Ting Huang, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Ze-Wei Lin, MM Department of Cardiac Surgery, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Zeng-Chun Wang, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China
  • Hua Cao, MD Fujian Key Laboratory of Women and Children’s Critical Diseases Research, Fujian Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Fuzhou, China
  • Qiang Chen, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Union Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3281

Keywords:

breast milk, formula milk, feeding, congenital heart surgery

Abstract

Objective: To explore the effects of breast milk feeding and formula milk feeding on infants after cardiac surgery in the cardiac intensive care unit (ICU).

Methods: Infants who underwent cardiac surgery in our ICU were divided into two groups, according to feeding type. Breast milk feeding and formula milk feeding were separately implemented in the two groups, and the remaining treatment regimens were the same. The related clinical data and feeding effects were recorded and compared.

Results: The prealbumin (147.3 ± 15.2 versus 121.5 ± 18.3mg/L) and albumin (46.4 ± 4.2 versus 40.5 ± 5.1 g/L) levels in the breast milk feeding group were better than those in the formula milk feeding group (P < .05). Infants in the breast milk feeding group achieved a better total enteral nutrition time (3.0 ± 1.2 versus 5.2 ± 2.1 d), average daily weight gain (19.0 ± 3.4 versus 14.4 ± 2.3 g/kg·d), length of ICU stay (6.0 ± 2.2 versus 8.1 ± 2.9 d) and length of hospital stay (13.9 ± 4.2 versus 17.8 ± 5.6 d) than those in the formula milk feeding group (P < .05). The incidence of complications such as feeding intolerance, anemia, dyspeptic diarrhea, and nosocomial infection was lower in the breast milk feeding group than in the formula milk feeding group (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: Breast milk feeding has a definite nutritional effect on infants after cardiac surgery. It is better than formula milk feeding, making it worthy of popularization and application.

References

Andreas NJ, Kampmann B, Mehring Le-Doare K. 2015. Human breast milk: A review on its composition and bioactivity. Early Hum Dev. Nov;91(11):629-35.

Boban M, Persic V, Miletic B, Kovacicek K, Madzar Z. 2013. Heart Surgery Stems Increased Nutritional Risk, Expressed During the Course of Stationary Rehabilitation. Ann Nutr Metab. 63(1-2):17-24.

El-Alameey IR, Ahmed HH, Monir ZM, Rabah TM, Abdel Gawad AM. 2015. Predictors of High Serum Casein Antibody Levels Among Malnourished Infants and Young infants With Congenital Heart Disease. Open Access Maced J Med Sci. Mar 15;3(1):91-8.

Eveleens RD, Joosten KFM, de Koning BAE, Hulst JM, Verbruggen SCAT. 2020. Definitions, predictors and outcomes of feeding intolerance in critically ill infants: A systematic review. Clin Nutr. Mar;39(3):685-693.

Fiocchi A, Bouygue GR, Albarini M, Restani P. 2011. Molecular Diagnosis of Cow's Milk Allergy. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. Jun; 11 (3): 216-21.

Fitria L, Caesa P, Joe J, Marwali EM. 2019. Did Malnutrition Affect Post-Operative Somatic Growth in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Surgical Procedures for Congenital Heart Disease? Pediatr Cardiol. Feb;40(2):431-436.

Froh EB, Spatz DL. 2014. An Ethical Case for the Provision of Human Milk in the NICU. Adv Neonatal Care. Aug;14(4):269-73.

Glavin K, Roelants M, Strand BH, Júlíusson PB, Lie KK, Helseth S, Hovengen R. 2014. Important periods of weight development in childhood: a population-based longitudinal study. BMC Public Health. Feb 13;14:160.

Goldberg JF. 2015. Long-term Follow-up of “Simple” Lesions--Atrial Septal Defect, Ventricular Septal Defect, and Coarctation of the Aorta. Congenit Heart Dis. Sep-Oct 10(5):466-74.

Hassiotou F, Geddes D. 2013. Anatomy of the human mammary gland: Current status of knowledge. Clin Anat. 26(1):29-48.

Hinde K, German JB. 2012. Food in an Evolutionary Context: Insights From Mother's Milk. J Sci Food Agric. Aug 30;92(11):2219-23.

Hochwallner H, Schulmeister U, Swoboda I, Spitzauer S, Valenta R. 2014. Cow’s milk allergy: From allergens to new forms of diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Methods. Mar 1; 66(1): 22–33.

Khoshnood B, Lelong N, Houyel L, Thieulin AC, Jouannic JM, Magnier S, Delezoide AL, Magny JF, Rambaud C, Bonnet D, Goffinet F. 2012. EPICARD Study Group. Prevalence, Timing of Diagnosis and Mortality of Newborns With Congenital Heart Defects: A Population-Based Study. Heart. Nov;98(22):1667-73.

Kreissl A, Sauerzapf E, Repa A, Binder C, Thanhaeuser M, Jilma B, Ristl R, Berger A, Haiden N. 2017. Starting Enteral Nutrition With Preterm Single Donor Milk Instead of Formula Affects Time to Full Enteral Feeding in Very Low Birthweight Infants. Acta Paediatr. Sep;106(9):1460-1467.

Liu S, Joseph KS, Lisonkova S, Rouleau J, Van den Hof M, Sauve R, Kramer MS. 2013. Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System (Public Health Agency of Canada). Association Between Maternal Chronic Conditions and Congenital Heart Defects: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Circulation. Aug 6;128(6):583-9.

Manthe ED, Perks PH, Swanson JR. 2019. Team-Based Implementation of an Exclusive Human Milk Diet. Adv Neonatal Care. Dec;19(6):460-467.

Prieto MB, López-Herce J. 2011. Malnutrition in the Critically Ill Child: The Importance of Enteral Nutrition. Int J Environ Res Public Health. Nov;8(11):4353-66.

Radman M, Mack R, Barnoya J, Castañeda A, Rosales M, Azakie A, Mehta N, Keller R, Datar S, Oishi P, Fineman J. 2014. The Effect of Preoperative Nutritional Status on Postoperative Outcomes in infants Undergoing Surgery for Congenital Heart Defects in San Francisco (UCSF) and Guatemala City (UNICAR). J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. Jan;147(1):442-50.

San Agustin JT, Klena N, Granath K, Panigrahy A, Stewart E, Devine W, Strittmatter L, Jonassen JA, Liu X, Lo CW, Pazour GJ. 2016. Genetic link between renal birth defects and congenital heart disease [J]. Nat Commun 7:1103.

Venugopalan P, Akinbami FO, Al-Hinai KM, Agarwal AK. 2001. Malnutrition in infants with congenital heart defects. Saudi Med J. 22(11):964-967.

Wren C, Irving CA, Griffiths JA, O'Sullivan JJ, Chaudhari MP, Haynes SR, Smith JH, Hamilton JRL, Hasan A. 2012. Mortality in Infants With Cardiovascular Malformations. Eur J Pediatr. Feb;171(2):281-7.

Yun SW. 2011. Congenital Heart Disease in the Newborn Requiring Early Intervention. Korean J Pediatr. May;54(5):183-91.

Zaidi S, Brueckner M. 2017. Genetics and Genomics of Congenital Heart Disease. Circ Res. Mar 17;120(6):923-940.

Zhu J and Dingess KA. 2019. The Functional Power of the Human Milk Proteome. Nutrients. Aug; 11(8): 1834.

Published

2020-11-18

How to Cite

yu, xian- rong, xu, ning, huang, shu- ting, lin, ze- wei, wang, zeng- chun, cao, hua, & chen, qiang. (2020). A Comparative Study on Breast Milk Feeding and Formula Milk Feeding in Infants With Congenital Heart Disease After Surgery: A Retrospective Study: Breast Milk Feeding in Infants after Cardiac Surgery. The Heart Surgery Forum, 23(6), E845-E849. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3281

Issue

Section

Articles