Minimally Invasive Aortic Arch Repair: Technical Considerations and Mid-Term Outcomes

Authors

  • Petar Risteski Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • Medhat Radwan Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • Gjoko Boshkoski Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • Razan Salem Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • Annarita Iavazzo Mediterranea Cardiocentro, Naples, Italy
  • Thomas Walther Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • Giampiero Esposito Mediterranea Cardiocentro, Naples, Italy

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3235

Keywords:

Aortic arch, minimally invasive, frozen elephant trunk

Abstract

Background: Reports of minimal invasive aortic arch surgery are scarce. We reviewed our experience with minimal access aortic arch surgery performed through an upper mini-sternotomy, with emphasis on details of operative technique and early and mid-term outcomes.

Methods: The medical records of 123 adult patients (mean age 66 ± 12 years), who underwent primary elective minimal access aortic arch surgery in two aortic referral centers, were reviewed. The most common indication was degenerative aortic arch aneurysm in 92 (75%) patients. Standard operative and organ protection techniques used in all patients were upper mini-sternotomy, uninterrupted antegrade cerebral perfusion, and moderate systemic hypothermia (27.4 ± 1°C).

Results: Sixty-eight (55%) patients received partial aortic arch replacement; the remaining 55 (45%) patients received total arch replacement, further extended with either a frozen elephant trunk in 43 (35%) patients or a conventional elephant trunk procedure in nine (7%) patients. No conversion to full sternotomy was required. New permanent renal failure occurred in one (0.8%) patient, stroke in two (1.6%), and spinal cord injury in four (3.3%) patients. Early mortality was observed in four (3.3%) patients. At five years, survival was 80 ± 6% and freedom from reoperation was 96 ± 3%.

Conclusion: Minimal invasive aortic arch repair through an upper mini-sternotomy can be safely performed, with early and mid-term outcomes well comparable to series performed through a standard median sternotomy.

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Published

2020-10-27

How to Cite

Risteski, P., Radwan, M., Boshkoski, G., Salem, R., Iavazzo, A., Walther, T., & Esposito, G. (2020). Minimally Invasive Aortic Arch Repair: Technical Considerations and Mid-Term Outcomes. The Heart Surgery Forum, 23(6), E803-E808. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3235

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