Retrograde Versus Antegrade Approach for the Endovascular Treatment of Symptomatic Femoropopliteal Disease: Results of the 2-Year Follow Up

Endovascular Versus Bypass

Authors

  • Emced Khalil Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Ordu University Research and Education Hospital, Ordu, Turkey
  • Sedat Ozcan Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Çanakkale 18 Mart University Faculty of Medicine, Çanakkale, Turkey

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3007

Keywords:

Superficial femoral artery, endovascular treatment, antegrade, retrograde, primary patency, complication

Abstract

Objective: To compare the antegrade and retrograde approaches, in terms of access site complications and long-term patency in subjects undergoing EVT for symptomatic SFA or popliteal artery stenosis or occlusions.

Methods: All consecutive patients who underwent retrograde recanalization for partial stenosis or chronic total occlusion of the SFA or PA at 2 centers were enrolled in this retrospective analysis. Subjects were divided into 2 groups, according to the approach selected for EVT as antegrade approach group or retrograde approach group. The rate of primary patency, which was defined as the lack of restenosis at the target lesion, was the primary outcome measure, during the follow-up evaluations. The rate of procedural complications, including hematoma, bleeding, and distal embolism, were secondary outcome measures.

Results: A significant improvement occurred in ABI, following the intervention in both the antegrade approach group [0.7 (0.3 - 1.1) versus 0.85 (0.4 - 1.3), P < 0.001] and retrograde approach group [0.5 (0.3 - 1.1) versus 0.8 (0.3 - 1.3), P < .001]. The primary patency rate at the 1st, 6th, 12th and 24th months of the intervention in the antegrade approach group were 94.85%, 83.82%, 74.26%, and 66.91%, respectively. The primary patency rate at the 1st, 6th, 12th, and 24th months of the intervention in the retrograde approach group were 93.33%, 86.67%, 84.44%, and 71.11%, respectively. The groups were similar with respect to the primary patency rates. The rate of complications, including hematoma, bleeding, and distal embolization was similar in the 2 groups.

Conclusion: Antegrade approach and retrograde approach provide a similar safety profile in the EVT of SFA and popliteal artery stenosis and occlusion. The primary patency rates at the 1st, 6th, 12th, and 24th months of follow up also were similar in the 2 groups. However, the significant difference in the lesion characteristics of the subjects undergoing retrograde or antegrade approach complicates the ability to reach a clear conclusion, regarding the superiority of one technique over the other.

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Published

2020-05-14

How to Cite

Khalil, E., & Ozcan, S. (2020). Retrograde Versus Antegrade Approach for the Endovascular Treatment of Symptomatic Femoropopliteal Disease: Results of the 2-Year Follow Up: Endovascular Versus Bypass. The Heart Surgery Forum, 23(3), E318-E322. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.3007

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Articles