Comparison of Short and Mid-Term Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis (Intermediate/High Risk) Who Underwent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement

Authors

  • Mehmet Ali Yesiltas Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Health Ministry Bakırköy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey
  • İsmail Haberal Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, İstanbul University Cerrahpasa Institute of Cardiology, İstanbul, Turkey
  • Yusuf Kuserli Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Health Ministry Bakırköy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey
  • Ahmet Yildiz Department of Cardiology, İstanbul University Cerrahpasa Institute of Cardiology, İstanbul, Turkey
  • Ahmet Ozan Koyuncu Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, İstanbul University Cerrahpasa Institute of Cardiology, İstanbul, Turkey
  • Sadiye Deniz Özsoy Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, İstanbul University Cerrahpasa Institute of Cardiology, İstanbul, Turkey

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2913

Keywords:

aortic surgery, cardiac surgery, transcatheter aortic valve replacement

Abstract

Treatment protocols for severe aortic valve stenosis include surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), balloon valvuloplasty, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), and medical  treatment. Because the success rates are getting higher with both SAVR and TAVR, making the right treatment decision is important.

This study retrospectively shows the short- (1 month) and mid-term (6 months) mortality and morbidity rate differences between 2 groups of patients, who arrived to our hospital from January 2014 through October 2018. The first group consists of 54 patients who underwent mid-high risk SAVR operations at Istanbul University-Cerrahpasa, Institute of Cardiology, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery. The second group consists of 57 patients who underwent TAVR at the Cardiology Department.

Preoperative evaluation showed that the mean age of the SAVR group (71.5 years) was higher than the TAVR group (80 years). Also, the history of previous cardiac valve replacement surgery significantly was higher in the SAVR group than the TAVR group (P = .028). There were no significant differences between the remaining preoperative tests and diagnostic procedures.

Of the patients who underwent SAVR, 3.7% experienced postoperative cardiac arrhythmias, while the 17.5% of patients from the TAVR group experienced cardiac arrhythmias after the procedure. This difference between the groups were statistically significant. Mortality rate was 9.3% in the SAVR group and 5.3% in the TAVR group. The mortality rate was not statistically different between the groups. There was no significant difference between the groups in the means of neurological incidents. The TAVR group had more vascular complications (17.9% to none) and pacemaker implantations (21.4% to 1.9%).

Minor or major bleeding was the most common reason for admission to the hospital after SAVR. Seven out of 10 patients experienced bleeding. Aortic regurgitation was more common in the TAVR group at the first and sixth month following the procedure. Ratios between the gradient values were higher in the SAVR group (P < .001). Peak gradient values at the sixth month following the procedure were lower than the values of the first month (P < .040).

Aortic regurgitation symptoms increased with patients at the mid-term follow-up appointment. To prevent the vascular complications in the TAVR group, preoperative peripheral vascular examination thoroughly should be performed. Considering that bleeding disorders are the main reason the SAVR group arrived to the hospital, INR values should closely be monitored. There seems to be no mortality difference between the groups at the six-month follow up, but studies should continue with more patients and long-term results.

References

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Published

2020-04-15

How to Cite

Yesiltas, M. A., Haberal, İsmail, Kuserli, Y., Yildiz, A., Koyuncu, A. O. ., & Özsoy, S. D. . (2020). Comparison of Short and Mid-Term Mortality and Morbidity in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis (Intermediate/High Risk) Who Underwent Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement. The Heart Surgery Forum, 23(2), E212-E220. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2913

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Articles