Effect of Pulsatile Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Adult Heart Surgery

Authors

  • Ersin Kadiroğulları, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Onur Sen, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Safa Gode, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Serdar Basgoze, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Barış Timur, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Aylin Basgoze, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Unal Aydin, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Burak Onan, MD Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Istanbul Mehmet Akif Ersoy Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2857

Keywords:

cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass, cerebral oxygen saturation, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to examine the effect of pulsatile flow pattern on tissue perfusion, particularly cerebral tissue perfusion, at pre-determined intervals during CPB, as well as its effects on postoperative morbidity and mortality.

Methods: This retrospective study included 134 adult patients, who underwent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Patients were grouped based on the flow pattern used during CPB: non-pulsatile CPB group (N = 82) and pulsatile CPB group (N = 52). Cerebral oxygen saturation, arterial pH and arterial lactate levels were measured at four time points, during the operation and the 2 groups were compared with regard to changes over time as well as differences in postoperative outcomes.

Results: The 2 groups were similar, in terms of mean values and intraoperative changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and arterial pH. Non-pulsatile CABG group had significantly higher arterial lactate levels over the measurement period, which was not affected by the timing of the measurements. Postoperative drainage, duration of ventilation and duration of hospital stay significantly were higher and postoperative blood urea nitrogen significantly was lower in the non-pulsatile CPB group. Other postoperative outcomes were similar across the groups.

Conclusion: Findings of this study do not support the superiority of pulsatile flow pattern during CPB, in terms of cerebral oxygen saturation or postoperative mortality/morbidity. Further and larger comparative studies are warranted before pulsatile blood flow pattern can be established as a routine clinical method.

References

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Published

2020-05-05

How to Cite

Kadiroğulları, E., Sen, O., Gode, S., Basgoze, S., Timur, B., Basgoze, A., Aydin, Ünal, & Onan, B. (2020). Effect of Pulsatile Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Adult Heart Surgery. The Heart Surgery Forum, 23(3), E258-E263. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2857

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