Vascular Tumors of the Neck in Adults: 10-Year Experience in a Tertiary Center

Authors

  • Onur S. Goksel, MD Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Emre Gok, MD Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Celalettin Karatepe, MD Mustafa Kemal University, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Antakya
  • Cagla Canbay Sarilar, MD Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Mehmet Akif Onalan, MD Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Metin Beyaz, MD Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Ufuk Alpagut, MD Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Istanbul, Turkey

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2769

Keywords:

Glomus Caroticum, Paraganglioma, Cavernous Hemangioma, Glomus Vagale, Carotid Sheath

Abstract

Introduction: The diagnosis and management of vascular lesions of the neck is a challenging task that requires a multidisciplinary approach. This retrospective study assesses the single center experience of vascular tumors of the neck.

Materials and methods: Patients diagnosed with a vascular tumor and/or a mass in close proximity to the carotid artery were identified from our records over a 10-year period. The demographic characteristics, clinical features, surgical approach, and outcomes were reviewed.

Results: Surgical excision of 17 vascular lesions were performed in 16 patients with a mean age of 51.56 ± 17.35 years at the time of operation. Intra- and/or postoperative clinical and histological assessment revealed unilateral glomus caroticum (N = 11), glomus vagale (N = 2), bilateral glomus caroticum (N = 1), cavernous hemangioma (N = 1), and carotid sheath tumor (N = 1). In three patients, internal carotid artery, common carotid artery and vagal nerve were sacrificed to facilitate complete tumor excision. During the follow-up period, no tumor recurrences were observed, and the morbidity and mortality were minimal.

Conclusion: Preoperative evaluation concerning the size, extent, and anatomical relationships of the tumor thoroughly should be investigated. Multidisciplinary approach involving vascular surgery, otolaryngology, and radiology is preferred to treat these patients for better outcomes. Preoperative embolization in selected cases may decrease estimated blood loss and operative time.

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Published

2020-07-20

How to Cite

GÖKSEL, O. S., Gok, E., Karatepe, C., Canbay Sarılar, Çağla, Önalan, M. A., Beyaz, M. O., & Alpagut, U. (2020). Vascular Tumors of the Neck in Adults: 10-Year Experience in a Tertiary Center. The Heart Surgery Forum, 23(4), E493-E497. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2769

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