Comparison of Isolated Primary CABG in Two Successive Decades in Patients Under 40 Years of Age

  • Przemyslaw Trzeciak 3rd Department of Cardiology,Silesian Center for Heart Diseases, Zabrze
  • Marian Zembala Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Silesian Center for Heart Diseases, Zabrze
  • Piotr Desperak 3rd Department of Cardiology,Silesian Center for Heart Diseases, Zabrze
  • Wojtek Karolak Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Silesian Center for Heart Diseases, Zabrze
  • Michal Zembala Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Silesian Center for Heart Diseases, Zabrze
  • Mariusz Gasior 3rd Department of Cardiology,Silesian Center for Heart Diseases, Zabrze

Abstract

Background: Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is rarely performed in very young patients. The purpose of our study is to compare the characteristics, treatments, in-hospital, and long-term outcomes of two groups of patients less than 40 years of age who had CABG in two successive decades: 1990-2000 and 2001-2011.
Methods: We identified 145 consecutive patients who underwent primary isolated CABG. Group 1 consisted of
78 patients operated between 1990-2000 and group 2 consisted of 67 patients operated between 2001-2011. Composite end point assessed at follow-up period involved death or recurrence of symptoms, which we defined as myocardial infarction, a need for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), reoperation, or congestive heart failure (CHF).  
Results: Smoking and hypercholesterolemia before CABG were noted as more frequent in group 1 than in group 2: 96.1% versus 83.6%, P = .011; 88.5% versus 61.2%,
P = .0001, respectively. Patients from group 2 more frequently received one graft (29.8% versus 11.5%, P = .0059), were operated with off-pump (41.8% versus 0%, P < .0001) or MIDCAB (28.4% versus 0%, P = .0008) techniques, and had complete arterial revascularization (58.2% versus 23.1%, P < .0001). Group 1 patients had a higher prevalence of composite end point (33.9% versus 17.9%, P = .035), with no significant difference in mortality (11.5% versus 10.4%, P = .83).
Conclusion: Patients operated between 1990-2000 had a higher prevalence of smoking and hypercholesterolemia and higher frequency of composite-end point during folow-up period without significant difference in mortality.

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Published
2016-06-24
How to Cite
Trzeciak, P., Zembala, M., Desperak, P., Karolak, W., Zembala, M., & Gasior, M. (2016). Comparison of Isolated Primary CABG in Two Successive Decades in Patients Under 40 Years of Age. The Heart Surgery Forum, 19(3), E139-E144. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.1448
Section
Articles