Clinical Application of Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome Combined with Intermediate Lesions

Authors

  • Hua Yu Department of Cardiology, Anhui Provincial Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei
  • Likun Ma Department of Cardiology, Anhui Provincial Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei
  • Kefu Feng Department of Cardiology, Anhui Provincial Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei
  • Hongwu Chen Department of Cardiology, Anhui Provincial Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei
  • Hao Hu Department of Cardiology, Anhui Provincial Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.1447

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance and safety of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTEACS) combined with intermediate lesions.

Methods: Sixty-five NSTEACS patients with intermediate lesions confirmed with coronary angiography at our department were included in this study. Among them,
33 patients received only standardized drug treatment (drug group) and the other 32 patients received percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) according to the OCT examination based on drug treatment (OCT group). Major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), revascularization, success rate of OCT examination, related complications, and other patient situations in the two groups during hospitalization and the 12-month follow-up period were compared.

Results: No death or stroke occurred in either group during hospitalization and follow-up. In the drug treatment group, six patients experienced frequent angina, and five patients with acute myocardial infarction were rehospitalized and underwent PCI procedures. In the OCT group, although two patients underwent repeat revascularization, no additional acute myocardial infarction events occurred. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < .01). All patients in the OCT group successfully completed the related vessel examination, and 24 patients underwent PCI procedures because of unstable plaque diagnosed with OCT.

Conclusion: OCT-guided PCI is safe and effective for the treatment of patients with NSTEACS combined with intermediate lesions.

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Published

2017-02-28

How to Cite

Yu, H., Ma, L., Feng, K., Chen, H., & Hu, H. (2017). Clinical Application of Optical Coherence Tomography in Patients with Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome Combined with Intermediate Lesions. The Heart Surgery Forum, 20(1), E032-E037. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.1447

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Articles