A New Arterial Cannulation Technique: Arterial Cannulation through Aortic Anastomosis (“Kaplan” Technique)

  • Mehmet Kaplan Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Anil Karaagac Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Mehmet Inanç Yesilkaya Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Tolga Can Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Yusuf Kagan Pocan Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey
  • Hakk Aydogan Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract

We performed Bentall procedure on a 65-year-old male patient. Cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated via cannulation of the aneurysmatic segment of the aorta. Distal anastomosis was performed with the open technique under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 18°C.

We performed arterial recannulation through the anastomosis with a new technique, and cardiopulmonary bypass was reestablished. Cardiopulmonary bypass was terminated after rewarming and de-airing phases, and decannulation was performed without any problems.

By this technique, the patient had no additional incisions for arterial cannulation, and there were no additional cannulation sutures left on the patient’s arterial tree or the
valved conduit.

References

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Published
2019-01-21
How to Cite
Kaplan, M., Karaagac, A., Yesilkaya, M., Can, T., Pocan, Y., & Aydogan, H. (2019). A New Arterial Cannulation Technique: Arterial Cannulation through Aortic Anastomosis (“Kaplan” Technique). The Heart Surgery Forum, 22(1), E008-E010. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.2273
Section
Articles