Nocardiosis in Heart Transplant Recipients

Authors

  • Michael M. Koerner Nazih Zudhi Transplant Institute/Advanced Cardiac Care, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City,Oklahoma
  • Aly El-Banayosy Nazih Zudhi Transplant Institute/Advanced Cardiac Care, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City,Oklahoma
  • Uwe Schulz Heart and Diabetes Center, North Rhine-Westphalia, Division of Heart Transplantation, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital of the Ruhr-University Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen
  • Mohamad Zeriouh Nazih Zudhi Transplant Institute/Advanced Cardiac Care, INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma City,Oklahoma
  • Reiner Koerfer Departmant of Heart and Vascular Surgery, Division for Surgical Therapy of End-Stage Heart Failure and Artificial Heart Support, Evangelisches und Johanniter Klinikum Niederrhein, Duisburg
  • Gero Tenderich Departmant of Heart and Vascular Surgery, Division for Surgical Therapy of End-Stage Heart Failure and Artificial Heart Support, Evangelisches und Johanniter Klinikum Niederrhein, Duisburg
  • Ali Ghodsizad Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.1372

Abstract

Nocardia has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, especially in organ transplant recipients. Heart transplant (HT) recipients initially had an especially high rate of Nocardia infection, but this could be reduced by the routine use of cyclosporine. Our objective was to clarify the prevalence and presentation of Nocardiosis in HT recipients in a retrospective cross-sectional analysis.

References

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Published

2015-12-14

How to Cite

Koerner, M. M., El-Banayosy, A., Schulz, U., Zeriouh, M., Koerfer, R., Tenderich, G., & Ghodsizad, A. (2015). Nocardiosis in Heart Transplant Recipients. The Heart Surgery Forum, 18(6), E250-E252. https://doi.org/10.1532/hsf.1372

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