The CentriMag: A New Optimized Centrifugal Blood Pump with Levitating Impeller

Authors

  • Juerg Peter Mueller
  • Andreas Kuenzli
  • Oliver Reuthebuch
  • Kurt Dasse
  • Stella Kent
  • Gregor Zuend
  • Marko Ivan Turina
  • Mario Louis Lachat

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.1532/HSF98.20041068

Abstract

Purpose: Blood pumps are routinely used for circulatory and pulmonary support. However, blood trauma and pump failure remain severe drawbacks of currently available pump models. This study evaluated the first clinical application of a new, totally bearingless centrifugal blood pump (CentriMag).

Material and Methods: A centrifugal pump consisting of an electromagnetic suspended impeller was used as a blood pump during beating-heart coronary artery bypass grafting in 11 patients (mean weight, 77.4 kg). Heparin in a bolus of 150 IU/kg body weight was administered, and activated clotting time was maintained at approximately 180 to 250 seconds during extracorporeal circulation. Pump-induced blood trauma was evaluated by measurement of plasma free hemoglobin (PFH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), hematocrit, total bilirubin, and platelet levels.

Results: Mean pump flow was 3.3 ± 0.62 L/min, and mean pressure gradient through the oxygenator was 69 ± 4 mm Hg. No pump dysfunction occurred during a mean application time of 105 ± 26 minutes. Inspection of the pump housings showed no internal thrombus formation despite low-dose heparinization. Only slight hemolysis was observed with a mean PFH level of 1.96 m mol/L; LDH, 460 U/L; hematocrit, 33%; total bilirubin, 25 m mol/L; and platelets, 191 ´ 103/ Conclusions: The bearingless CentriMag blood pump is a safe and reliable new device that produces only minimal hemolysis. It seems to be suited for long-term evaluation as a blood pump for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or as ventricular assist device.

References

Vaislic C, Bical O, Farge C, et al. 2003. Totally minimized extracorporeal circulation: an important benefit for coronary artery bypass grafting in Jehovah's witnesses. Heart Surg Forum 6:307-10.nMoen O, Fosse E, Dregelid E, et al. 1996. Centrifugal pump and heparin coating improves cardiopulmonary bypass biocompatibility. Ann Thorac Surg 62:1134-40.nNaito K, Suenaga E, Cao ZL, et al. 1996. Comparative hemolysis study of clinically available centrifugal pumps. Artif Organs 20:560-3.nMoen O, Fosse E, Braten J, et al. 1994. Roller and centrifugal pumps compared in vitro with regard to haemolysis, granulocyte and complement activation. Perfusion 9:109-17.nAndersen KS, Nygreen EL, Grong K, Leirvaag B, Holmsen H. 2003. Comparison of the centrifugal and roller pump in elective coronary artery bypass surgery: a prospective, randomized study with special emphasis upon platelet activation. Scand Cardiovasc J 37:356-62.n

Published

2005-01-04

How to Cite

Mueller, J. P., Kuenzli, A., Reuthebuch, O., Dasse, K., Kent, S., Zuend, G., Turina, M. I., & Lachat, M. L. (2005). The CentriMag: A New Optimized Centrifugal Blood Pump with Levitating Impeller. The Heart Surgery Forum, 7(5), E477-E480. https://doi.org/10.1532/HSF98.20041068

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