Modified Peritoneal Dialysis for Treatment of Acute Renal Failure after Complex Congenital Heart Surgery in Infants

  • Lefeng Zhang Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, First Hospital Affiliated to Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • Yongqiang Jin Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, First Hospital Affiliated to Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • Fuqiang Zhang Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, First Hospital Affiliated to Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • Hongyin Li Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, First Hospital Affiliated to Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
  • Qingyu Wu Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, First Hospital Affiliated to Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Keywords: modified peritoneal dialysis, acute renal failure, Seldinger technique, central venous catheter

Abstract

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the common complications in infants and children after complex congenital heart surgery. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is usually applied for renal replacement therapy (RRT), especially in infants. We investigated the efficacy and safety of modified PD for the treatment of acute renal failure and congestive heart failure after cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease in infants. 

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed five consecutive patients from October 2015 to February 2017. The patients were aged from four days to five years old, and all had acute renal failure and congestive heart failure after cardiac surgery. In the five patients treated with modified PD (five males; average weight: 11.2 ± 5.5 kg), we used the Seldinger technique percutaneous abdominal puncture 16 G single lumen central venous catheter instead of the Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter as a PD catheter. Modified PD was intermittent. We recorded and monitored circulation and metabolism index.

Results: Five cases (100%) with modified PD were restored to normal renal function. Congestive heart failure was gradually alleviated, and pulmonary and cardiovascular function were improved. Urine volume increased. Neither peritonitis nor catheter leakage occured in any of our cases. Urine volume increased due to PD, from 0.16 + 0.18 mL/kg*h before PD to 2.63 + 1.05 ml/kg*h at the end of PD
(P < .05). Serum creatinine, serum urea nitrogen, and serum K+ changed from 85.0 ± 36.5 µmol/L, 17.1 ± 7.5 mmol/L, and 4.57 ± 0.30 mmol/L before PD, to 76.0 ± 36.7 µmol/L, 20.1 ± 11.0 mmol/L, and 4.42 ± 0.42 mmol/L at the end of PD, respectively (P > .05). Acidosis, hyperkalemia, hypoxemia and low cardiac output syndrome were improved. All patients were cured and discharged with normal renal function. 

Conclusions: We conclude that modified single lumen central venous catheter for PD is a safe, feasible, and less invasive therapeutic strategy for AKI in infants undergoing cardiac surgery, and is worthy of being widely applied in clinical practice. 

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Published
2018-06-25
Section
Articles