Analysis of Nosocomial Infections in Post–Cardiac Surgery Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support Therapy

  • Binfei Li Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
  • Geqin Sun Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
  • Zhou Cheng Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
  • Chuangchuang Mei Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
  • Xiaozu Liao Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
  • Jianwei Li Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China
  • Yong Yuan Department of Examination Medical Center, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong, China

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to analyze the nosocomial infection factors in post–cardiac surgery extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) supportive treatment (pCS-ECMO).

Methods: The clinical data of the pCS-ECMO patients who obtained nosocomial infections (NI) were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Among the 74 pCS-ECMO patients, 30 occurred with NI, accounting for 40.5%; a total of 38 pathogens were isolated, including 22 strains of Gram-negative bacteria (57.9%), 15 strains of Gram-positive bacteria (39.5%), and 1 fungus (2.6%).

Results: Multidrug-resistant strains were highly concentrated, among which Acinetobacter baumannii and various coagulase-negative staphylococci were the main types; NI was related to mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit (ICU) residence, ECMO duration, and total hospital stay, and the differences were statistically significant (P < .05). The binary logistic regression analysis indicated that ECMO duration was a potential independent risk factor (OR = 0.992, P = .045, 95.0% CI = 0.984-1.000).

Conclusions: There existed significant correlations between the secondary infections of pCS-ECMO and mechanical ventilation time, ICU residence, ECMO duration, and total hospital stay; therefore, hospitals should prepare appropriate preventive measures to reduce the incidence of ECMO secondary infections.

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Published
2018-09-17
Section
Articles